Confessions of an Almost Capsule Wardrobe Dropout

I poured organic whole milk over brightly colored, artificially dyed + flavored, knock off name brand cereal.

I let out a sigh of humored disgust.

A few words entered my mind:

Pointless. Ironic. Embarrassing. Wrong.

I still throw together some questionable meals when it comes to pleasing my husband’s palette and my strong desire to feed my family whole + real foods; but this scene I’ve described -- the one full of doubt and question -- was just one of the many baby steps we’ve taken to get to where we are today and radically change the way we buy and eat food.

Bite by bite.

As I pulled the trigger recently on a few staple clothing pieces from an arguably fast fashion company I again thought to myself:

Pointless. Ironic. Embarrassing. Wrong.

But why?  Why do I feel this way?

I wanted to call it quits. If I can’t do it right -- commit to buying only fewer + high quality + ethically made pieces -- then why do it at all?

With this all or nothing approach the term ‘cognitive dissonance’ was most assuredly an understatement to describe my state of mind.

Credit Laura Blanton, TheLovelyLauraLife.com

Credit Laura Blanton, TheLovelyLauraLife.com


A capsule wardrobe by definition is not inherently inclusive of [only] ethically made clothing and/or, conscientious style abiding brands. But the two ideologies certainly do bolster one another and the dialogue overlaps seemingly more and more everyday.

Less is more, but quality is more too…

And then there’s ethically made.

Credit Laura Blanton, TheLovelyLauraLife.com

Credit Laura Blanton, TheLovelyLauraLife.com

Now there’s a loaded statement regarding fashion! Warranting an entire conversation in and of itself.  I think Caroline accurately addressed the spectrum that exists within the slow fashion advocate community and Leah unveils hard truths and even more grey areas that exist regarding ethical fashion -- as opposed to the black and white matter we would sometimes paint it to be. But the more I thought about all of the components that were causing me this sense of cognitive dissonance I realized that when you boil down the word “ethical” you are largely left with: right vs. wrong...

I believe it is not right to support the existence of a clothing industry that relies on cheaply made, will fall-apart-in-three-months-time pieces and that promotes an impulsive, fast paced, must-be-on-trend, new-outfit-for-every-occasion, I-have-nothing-to-wear fashion culture.

I also believe it is not right to disregard (and therefore not adhere to) my own household budget in order to support an industry that relies on quality made clothing and conscientious style brands -- and also supplies me with an adequate number of pieces I need to function within my lifestyle. Being a mom with young children is taxing on any wardrobe. Navigating a postpartum body just makes it that much more challenging.

So here I am again: pouring organic whole milk overtop cereal that screams fake and problematic.

*Sigh of humored disgust*

Andrea says that “a capsule wardrobe is a vehicle, not a destination.”

Baby steps.

Bite by bite.


Credit Laura Blanton, TheLovelyLauraLife.com

Credit Laura Blanton, TheLovelyLauraLife.com

All goals have phases. Checkpoints. Roadblocks.

But most importantly? They take time, and conviction.  Allowing those roadblocks to impede you from keeping steadfast and accomplish your overall goal is well, lame.

Commit.  Adapt. Persevere. Change yours and others’ lives.

Right now my capsule wardrobe experience has sparked a desire to march to the beat of a different drum: slow fashion. And even though my commitment level feels black and white I know the process will not be.  

Right now my baby steps involve:

  • Purchasing high quality secondhand pieces first when I identify a clothing need,

  • adding high quality items from brands that emphasize transparency + do not bolster ‘trends’ and

  • filling in the few remaining gaps with extremely conscientious purchases from brands that would likely be considered members of the fast fashion community -- these pieces are always something I genuinely love on me, fit my core style and do not fall into the category “trendy”.

I’ve baby-stepped my way to less is more -- dressing with about 40 pieces each season as a mom with young kids, who works part time in an office setting and lives on a farm…

Now I’m baby-stepping my way to quality is more too.

What are your style goals? Are you using a capsule wardrobe as a method of achieving these goals? Have you reached some major checkpoints? Roadblocks?

This was a guest post by Laura Blanton from The Lovely Laura Life. She's a self-proclaimed farm wife wannabe living with her husband Nick and their two boys, Wyatt and Thurser, on their small farm in southwest Ohio. She's a part-time marketer for a small company two days a week and the rest of the time you can find her: chasing their dogs & chickens, winging it in the kitchen, hiding behind a camera, blogging about motherhood, style & diy farm life or otherwise "mom-ing" it up -- and trying to do it all with a little bit of grace.

This was a guest post by Laura Blanton from The Lovely Laura Life. She's a self-proclaimed farm wife wannabe living with her husband Nick and their two boys, Wyatt and Thurser, on their small farm in southwest Ohio. She's a part-time marketer for a small company two days a week and the rest of the time you can find her: chasing their dogs & chickens, winging it in the kitchen, hiding behind a camera, blogging about motherhood, style & diy farm life or otherwise "mom-ing" it up -- and trying to do it all with a little bit of grace.


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